Wednesday, May 13, 2020

Guest Blogger: R.B. Shifman




                                           Still Running Deep: Savage Spells Book 3 by [R.B. Shifman]




Please tell us about your latest book.

So, SPOILERS ahead. If you haven’t read Savage Spells Book 1, “Everyone Leaves This Place,” and Savage Spells Book 2, “Love’s Heavy Spell,” then you should STOP reading this interview and read those two books. Book 1 has received rave reviews. Book 2 also has been well-received.

For those who’ve read Book 1 and Book 2, let me tell you about Savage Spells Book 3, entitled, “Still Running Deep.” The book picks up the same day Book 2 left off, March 8, 2020, with Evee Salazar and Mark Perrino split up but still thinking about each other.
Evee’s life is back on track: She’s assumed control of her powers and shined in her new internship. She steps into a loving relationship, but I won’t say any more about that. 
But a blizzard of trouble is about to blow into town. Three evil witches surface, still conspiring to control the AI technology that will shape their dark vision of the future. 
To complicate matters, the mystical force that guides Evee’s coven instructs her to perform what seems like an unthinkably wicked act. If she can’t follow this gut-wrenching path, Evee may not be able to stave off the dark-magic witches’ plans for world domination.

What can we expect from you in the future?

I’m working on two new projects/ series:
I’m scrubbing and enhancing an unpublished fantasy novel I wrote from 2013-2018 called “Dark Water and the Maiden.” It’s set in 1973, and it’s got a “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe” meets “A Wrinkle in Time” meets James Bond vibe. Beta readers love this work, and it’s a very personal story inspired by my childhood and the first school I attended in Bethesda, Maryland. This novel is part of a four-book series, “Seams Along the Near World,” which I intend to publish in the next couple of years.
I’m also about twenty to twenty-five percent into drafting a new, Upper Middle Grade/Lower Young Adult (12-15 years old) science fiction/horror novel in a new series. I’m withholding nearly everything about this story. I just had a beta reader tell me it’s the best thing I’ve ever written. I’m writing it in the first-person present, which is new for me, from the perspective of a thirteen-year-old boy who’s just had his life turned upside down (but he doesn’t know he’s in for a bunch more trouble). I’m super excited about the story. It’s high concept (easily explained). It’ll probably be part of a series of 3-4 novels. I’m at the stage we’re I’ve taken a break from writing to research certain things.


How do we find out about you and your books?

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link to purchase all SAVAGE SPELLS books on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/R.B.-Shifman/e/B07Y28F8N5?ref_=pe_1724030_132998060


How much of your personality and life experiences are in your writing?

Let’s say enough of my life experience is in my work to make my wife mildly uncomfortable.

As I finish a series, I look back, and I can always see my subconscious mind was trying to teach me a lesson in real life. In Savage Spells Book 3, which just got published, it’s about how to deal with failure.


When did you first think about writing and what prompted you to submit your first ms?

I wrote some stuff in my early teens, but I truly began writing with a passion when I hit my mid-thirties in 2002. At this time, I felt compelled to write a novel that harkened to the nostalgia of my childhood – “Riverwood: Remembrance,” which is part of my “Seams Along the Near World” series. I wrote four books in that urban fantasy series from 2002-2018. I’m proud of “Dark Water & the Maiden,” which I wrote last, from 2013-2018; this story is a prequel. This book, set mainly in 1973, could be the most emotionally resonant work I’ve ever created. As I noted, I’m cleaning up this work now.


Do you have a set schedule for writing, or do you just go with the flow?

I try to write in the morning, for a few hours, at least a few times a week. I do work a contract job, where the work is variable, so I often need to adjust my schedule. With COVID-19, I’ve had some added time to write, as my hours have been greatly reduced. But I’ve also been looking for work—so there’s that.



What about your family, do they know not to bother you when you are writing - or are there constant interruptions?

People leave me alone. Mostly.




What do you do to relax and recharge your batteries?

I work out. I walk because I have a bad knee and can’t run anymore. I listen to music. And, last but not least, I chill with my wife, Sheri, watching TV or hanging out around Doylestown (not lately, but we hope to get back there when things open up).



Where do your ideas come from?

The ether. Seriously, sometimes it feels like my ideas come from another dimension. Probably from my dreams. Who knows?



Do you feel humor is important in books and why?

Yes. It keeps people engaged and makes characters likable. I’ve never understood people in real life who are humorless, as they seem to take themselves too seriously. A certain amount of humor keeps the ball rolling so to speak, moving that narrative forward.



What kind of research do you do?

There’s almost always research involved. For “Still Running Deep,” I spoke with Rick Mitchell, who is the Chief Meteorologist for NBC affiliate in Dallas-Fort Worth. We discussed the weather, but that’s all I want to say.
For my new SciFi/Horror WIP, there are a couple different settings about which I need to understand more. So, I’m in the process of doing that online and through phone interviews.


Please tell us about yourself.  

God is the most important, guiding force in my life. Without God I truly believe nothing else in my life would fall into place. Doesn’t mean God always makes things perfect for me, but because of God, my wife and I have a close, loving relationship, and I learn more every day about my purpose here on earth.

My family is important to me, including my wife, son (21) and daughter (18). My daughter is transgender, and LGBTQ rights are important to me (these rights were important to me before I knew she was transgender; they’re human rights).

I’m a writer by nature. I wrote an awful book when I was fourteen on a typewriter. I’ve worked as a market researcher, but a writer is what I am.



What are some of your favorite things to do?

If you want to know about my interests, outside of hanging with my wife—I like dancing to DJ Earworm when nobody is watching, reading all sorts of stuff (from bestsellers like “All the Light We Cannot See” to YA like “We Are Okay,” to fantasy like “The Vine Witch”), working out/walking (I was a wrestler in high school and a coach for youth wrestling many years), and watching University of Miami Football. I do like a good Netflix series. We just finished Season 3 of ‘Ozark,’ and I’m such a huge Laura Linney fan. I like to teach; since I published Savage Spells, I’ve taught a couple of high school classes about Creative Writing.

I’d like to travel abroad someday.



Who are some of your other favorite authors to read?

Lately, I’ve been getting into Charlie N. Holmberg, Luanne Smith, and Rhys Bowen.

Another Solstice author, Kari R. Joyner, has the best, ‘book club’ type story out called “Bloom Where You’re Planted.” Love it!



What do you think of critique groups in general?

I [still] don’t know much about them. I’ve got my little group of people who beat up my work in private.



Where do you see yourself in five years?

If things proceed as I desire, writing full time. We’ll see. I do like market research contracting, but if I could make a full-time living by writing, I would.



How many books have you written, how many have been published?

My Seams series has four books. And there’s the Savage Spells trilogy. So, seven total and one on the way in my new SciFi/horror series.



After you've written your book and it's been published, do you ever buy it and/or read it?

Yes. Writing a trilogy, I had to reread my work to ensure I didn’t forget details. It’s essential to maintain cross-novel consistency.



Among your own books, have you a favorite book? Favorite hero or heroine?

Evee Salazar is near and dear to my heart.
After this, Paul Branch from “Dark Water & the Maiden.”



What is the most rewarding thing about being a writer?

When somebody says your book touched their heart. If you write from the heart, you tap into this universal need for connection and permanence, which I believe is Divine. If a book makes you shed a tear, that’s where it’s coming from. My debut series, at first, seems very light-hearted (sort of like the reader’s first impression of Evee), but I believe it taps into some deep emotional territory. I hope it resonates with people, which is most rewarding.

Also, when you write something, and you know it’s super-hot (well crafted, sharp, highly readable, engaging, etc.). That’s a GREAT feeling because it only happens, for me, about 30% of the time.



If you weren't writing, what would you be doing?

I honestly don’t know.



What is your greatest desire?

To see my wife and children thrive and to serve a higher purpose here on earth. I know that’s two things. I believe these two things are connected though.

After that, I’d take a film deal for one of my books/series. I’ve said this before, I’d like to see actress, Isabela Merced play Evee Salazar.



Are there any words of encouragement for unpublished writers?

Sixteen years. That’s how long it took me between writing my first novel and publishing. Also, keep your mind open to advice and learning new things to improve your writing. It helped me for sure. I’m still learning.




Friday, May 1, 2020

New Release ~ The Long Road To Love



In this romantic comedy Jack and Jade, who have been best friends since childhood are both dating all the wrong people. After a date they meet up and discuss how horrible it was. Their dates generally go from bad to worse. Jack has been on dates where the girl is marrying them on the first date and Jade has been on dates where the guy asks her to help him rob a bank. They continue on down this long road to love leaning on each other through all the wrong turns.

Thursday, March 26, 2020

Guest Blogger KC Sprayberry



“We are fighting a war with no front lines, since the enemy hides among the people, in the jungles and mountains, and uses covertly border areas of neutral countries. One cannot measure our progress by lines on a map.”

—General William C. Westmoreland.


Vietnam – the name of a country that still evokes strong emotions even forty-seven years after our troops left that region. For far too many people, the memories of their time there are as fresh today as they were when they were fighting in those jungles. Back home, families not only had to contend with the horrific images on nightly news reports, but also the hatred generated by the anti-war protestors.
                        
Tish says goodbye to her long-time boyfriend, Steve, hoping and praying she will see him when his thirteen months in country are over. When she’s told he’s MIA, status unknown, her world shatters. But she never gives up on him, and always believes they will one day reunite…






Blurb

Dear Steve, I miss you so much and promise that I will never give up on you. Love you always and forever, Tish.

Tish Brady embarks on a journey she hopes will give her perspective for her future. During a time of unrest, she connects with young men bound for Vietnam, war protestors, and others with no idea what their future holds during the turbulence of 1967.

The Summer of Love is just the beginning of Tish’s journey…









Excerpt



Dear Steve, I can’t say this out loud. If I do, I might start crying, and I don’t want your last sight of me for the next thirteen months to be of tears. I also don’t want you to go, but I understand that you must. Keep your head down, darling. Love you always and forever, Tish.
***
We don’t speak for most of the ride. I can’t help myself. My birthday is coming up soon but I don’t feel happy to be turning eighteen. Instead, I’m ready to cry for the rest of my life, or the thirteen months my guy, Steve Mason, is in Vietnam.



About K.C. Sprayberry

“I have a secret… a very special secret. Perhaps you’ve heard this one before… from the time I was a child, I wanted to write stories for people to read.” K.C. Sprayberry

Former California native, K.C. Sprayberry, traveled the U.S. and Europe before finally settling in the mountains of Northwest Georgia. She’s been married to her soulmate for more than a quarter of a century and they enjoy spoiling their grandchildren along with many other activities.

Inspiration strikes at the weirdest times and drives her to grab notebook and pen to jot down her ideas. Those close to her swear nothing or no one is safe if she’s smiling gently in a corner and watching those in the same room interact. Her observations have often given her ideas for her next story, set not only in the South but wherever the characters demand they settle.


Social Media

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Friday, March 20, 2020

Solstice Publishing authors

Solstice Publishing and the authors are offering books free, starting March 23 and going through March 27. These authors will be offering you action, adventure, romance, and so much more!
Lynne Marino: Five Things, The Cha-Cha Affair

Missy Turner: The Push

Richard Dalglish, Author: Murder in the Querl
Jim Osborne: Secret Shepherd

Margaret Egrot: And Alex Still Has Acne, Cast Off

Robert Hoppensteadt: Spawn of the Cataclysm

Simon Maltman: A Chaser on the Rocks, A Kill for the Poet

Author K.C. Sprayberry: Canoples Investigations Tackles Space Pirates, Canoples Investigations Versus Spacers Rule, Canoples Investigations Exposes Space Dodger, Secret Society A Canoples Investigations Novella, Canoples Investigations Pursues Believers, Canoples Investigations Destroys Dusters, Wildcat Crew 1 The Case of the Vanishing Girls Wildcat Crew 1 The Case of the Scared Child, Wildcat Crew 3 The Case of the Missing Brother, Wildcat Crew 4 The Case of Where is Marnie Wildwood?

Stay tuned for links once these books are free on Amazon!

Thursday, March 19, 2020

Monday, February 24, 2020

Guest blogger Dianne Hartsock

                                                      Belega The Karthagans Book 1 by [Hartsock, Dianne]
https://www.amazon.com/Belega-Karthagans-Book-Dianne-Hartsock-ebook/dp/B084P7NJFR/


The Karthagans have regained their ancient powers of manipulating nature, but at the price of madness. In their lust for control they’ve destroyed their island and most of their race. They come now to Belega where one of them, Camron, seeks domination over the known world. The Mage has come from the northern continent of Sennia to bring peace, but finding his strength no match for the coming struggle, he passes his abilities on to Natan, who only desires a simple life. Now only Natan has the ability to stop Camron, but the personal cost is more than he imagines. It is only with the combined strength of his friends, his Karthagan lover, Kavi, and his deep desire to bring peace to the earth, that he finds the courage to overcome Camron and restore balance to the world. The power of the mind is immense. In this world, mankind has learned to gather the energies of creation to use at their whim. But absolute power corrupts absolutely.

Friday, February 21, 2020

Guest Blogger: Serena Gucci

                                    Who Needs Tomorrow by [Gucci, Serena]
https://www.amazon.com/Who-Needs-Tomorrow-Serena-Gucci-ebook/dp/B084BTR2P8/


"Bonjour Mademoiselle.” ‘Two words. Two simple little words. And though the voice that spoke them was one she hadn’t heard in nearly fifteen years it was as familiar and intimate to her as her own personal brand of perfume.’The last person Chloe Lavalle expected to see in her boss’s office was Alex Martin, a lover from her past. But it seems he’s never forgotten her, as she was his top pick as lead interpreter for his company’s green energy talks with Russia at the United Nations. Hesitant at first, that their association would spark up old feelings, Chloe ultimately agrees. Chloe and Alex maintain their professional facades, though they are constantly fielding sexual tension during the talks until the last night, where after a banquet at The Plaza Hotel, their defences melt away. The lovers reach an impasse, until the last day of the conference, when things go terribly wrong. Terrorists take over the United Nations building and seize Chloe, Alex and their entire delegation as bargaining chips. Can a nightmarish thirteen hours as hostages in the UN Secretariat Building, a daring escape from their terrorist captors and assisting Navy SEAL’s in saving their delegation from certain death, reclaim their impassioned love?With an international setting, a tenacious, empowered woman as the protagonist and a loving, strong, but flawed man as her love interest, Who Needs Tomorrow will draw you in and keep you reading until the very last page.

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Guest blogger: Tanya Reimer

                              The Box by [Reimer, Tanya]
https://www.amazon.com/Box-Tanya-Reimer-ebook/dp/B084G7ZMY2/


Inspiration can’t be contained in a box...

After Greg’s father goes missing from their boring lives, Greg finds an empty box while cleaning out his apartment. The contents inspire him to see things outside the box, but will he brave stepping into it?

Sunday, February 16, 2020

The Cover Is Not The Book

                          For all Authors and Readers


From Mary Poppins Returns
Song she is singing at the Royal Doulton Music Hall


He said a cover is not the book
So open it up and take a look
'Cause under the covers one discovers
That the king may be a crook
Chapter titles are like signs
And if you read between the lines
You'll find your first impression was mistook
For a cover is nice, but a cover is not the book




Remember this song. Don't judge a book by its cover! You might miss out on a great book! 

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Guest Blogger: R.B. Shifman




                                                  SPOILERS ahead for Book 1

Love’s Heavy Spell: Savage Spells Book 2 by [Shifman, R.B.]





Please tell us about your latest book.


SPOILERS ahead for Book 1, “Everyone Leaves This Place.” If you haven’t read Savage Spells Book 1, “Everyone Leaves This Place,” then you should STOP reading this interview and read that book. Book 1 has received favorable reviews, including from about a couple of dozen readers, an award-winning author, a professional review site, and Sue Naegle, the Chief Content Officer of Annapurna Pictures, a major motion picture/entertainment company.

For those who have already read Book 1, let me tell you some about Savage Spells Book 2, entitled ‘Love’s Heavy Spell.’ The book picks up where Book 1 left off, in fall 2019, with Evee and Mark both attending college at the University of Miami.

Evee, of course, has been freed from the evil witch’s body, and she takes a breath, expecting college life in Miami to simmer down. But then tragedy strikes close to home, and a bizarre coven calls on her to help fight for their cause. I don’t want to say more about this and spoil the fun.

Evee’s new calling puts a strain on her relationship with her boyfriend, Mark, and, even worse, thrusts her into a cat-and-mouse game with a narcissistic, billionaire witch.

In this mystical story of love and loss, Evee must figure out how to stop this wicked witch from corrupting a budding AI technology with dark magic, or she could become his next victim.



What can we expect from you in the future?

This book is the second in my Upper YA/NA series, Savage Spells, in which I plan to write at least one more novel. The series will at least be a trilogy, probably ending there. The series becomes darker and more deliciously devious and mystical with each novel. In Book 3, as in all third parts, there will be even more action and mysteries revealed, again expanding the mythology surrounding Evee Salazar and the ‘Witches’ of America.
Later this year, I’ll also be starting another series, probably a trilogy, for Upper MG/YA. It’s still tightly under wraps. The only thing I’ll say is that it’s SWEEEEET!



How do we find out about you and your books?
https://rbshifmanauthor.com/
and https://www.facebook.com/RB-Shifman-Author-103770317675113/
and https://twitter.com/rshifman




How much of your personality and life experiences are in your writing? What kind of research do you do?

I’ll answer this for Book 2. The book is alternately set in the Philadelphia, PA area (Philly and fictional Dairytown, which is inspired by Doylestown, PA) and the Miami area (Coral Gables, Little Havana, South Beach, etc.). A lot of it is inspired by real places. For instance, Miley Arculano’s apartment might look a bit look my first apartment when I moved to Philly thirty years ago. The University of Miami where Evee and Mark go to school is an alt-world college (e.g., Evee lives in Hetch Residence Hall, which, in real world, is Hecht Residence), but it is similar in some ways to the real thing. There are a bunch of places and people within the Miami portions of the book that are drawn from places I’ve been to and people I’ve met. But, it’s all fictional in the end.
Also, there are a couple of scenes in the book related to business, including how Marketing creates and tests concepts, which will be important in Book 3 (again, I don’t want to give away too much). I drew upon my decades in business to write these scenes.
My daughter attends college for Computer Science (CS), and I used what I know about her program to fill in some of the blanks regarding Evee’s knowledge and other characters’ knowledge of CS and programming.
The idea that one of the smartest kids in the world (Parker Twiddle, also a character in one of my short stories) comes from Dairytown sounds fantastic. But, recently, my real-life hometown of Doylestown, PA produced one of the smartest kids in the world when it comes to puzzle solving. And, as everybody knows, Evee Salazar is a phenomenal singer; correspondingly, there are so many young people with angelic singing voices in Doylestown, it makes me wonder if there is magic at work here (FYI, the pop singer, Alecia Moore, a.k.a., Pink is from Doylestown, too). I need to stress though, my characters—their appearance, behaviors, flaws, etc.—are FICTIONAL. But some very high-level traits, such as intelligence or singing ability, have been inspired by real-life people.
Growing up in South Florida/Miami, I had friends in the Cuban American community. Given this represents an important part of Evee’s heritage, I wanted to portray the Cuban American community, including Evee’s ties to this culture, accurately and positively in the novel. I drew upon my experiences in Miami. And I also called on a good friend of mine, Teresa Garcia, mostly to check my Spanish, which is sprinkled in some of the chapters. Teresa also helped me pin down certain details (e.g., what types of shoes would Evee’s Tio Roberto—Uncle Roberto—wear?), because little things count when you’re writing (People who don’t speak Spanish, rest assured, I wrote things in a way that you’ll be able to follow what’s going on and the meaning of what people are saying in the few instances where Spanish is used). If there are mistakes here, they are my fault, though.
I also researched where the wealthiest people in Coral Gables might live and what their houses (and yachts) might look like.
Regarding my life experience, last, but not least, I was inspired to write this book by my friendship with Dr. Paul Esposito, a fraternity brother from Miami who passed recently at the age of fifty in 2017. Paul was one of these people who was, simply, a shining light, always there to encourage others. And he came into my life early in my sophomore year of college when I was feeling lost, and he (and the people
who revolved around him like planets around a sun) changed the course of my college career and probably my life. He taught me a lot about the power of positive, bold thinking. I hadn’t kept up with Paul as much as I should have, maybe once every few months by phone. I always wondered if he felt as close as a friend to me as I did to him because he, as an extrovert, had so many good friends. And, because of this, I kept quiet at his funeral and didn’t testify about what kind of person he was and what he meant to me. I still feel like I should have said something then, and this book about love and loss is my way of telling him, or his spirit, how much his friendship means to me. The book is dedicated to Paul, and there are pieces of him in it throughout the story. People who knew him will spot “Espo” references, such as how Mark’s mother tells him to walk into a nightclub with a bit of swagger (Okay, now I’m saying too much).



When did you first think about writing and what prompted you to submit your first ms?

I wrote some stuff in my early teens, but I truly began writing with a passion when I hit my mid-thirties in 2002. At this time, I felt compelled to write a novel that harkened to the nostalgia of my childhood – “Riverwood: Remembrance,” which is part of my “Seams Along the Near World” series. I wrote four books in that urban fantasy series from 2002-2018. I’m proud of “Dark Water & the Maiden,” which I wrote last, from 2013-2018; this story is a prequel. This book, set mainly in 1973, is a highly emotionally resonant work, at least for me. I submitted ‘Dark Water,’ because it had all 5-star reviews on a free site, but it didn’t get picked up.




Do you have a set schedule for writing or do you just go with the flow?

I mostly try to write in the early morning, for a few hours, at least several times a week. I sometimes need to adjust my schedule because of work.




What about your family, do they know not to bother you when you are writing - or are there constant interruptions?


My family leaves me alone. Mostly.





What do you do to relax and recharge your batteries?

I work out. I walk because I have a bad knee and can’t run anymore. I listen to music. And, last but not least, I chill with my wife, Sheri, watching TV or hanging out around Doylestown.


Where do your ideas come from?

The ether. Seriously, sometimes it feels like my ideas come from another dimension.




Do you feel humor is important in books and why?

Yes. It keeps people engaged and makes characters likable. It releases tension if you’re dealing in dark or sad themes. A certain amount of humor keeps the ball rolling so to speak, moving that narrative forward.





Please tell us about yourself.

God is the most important, guiding force in my life. Without God I truly believe nothing else in my life would fall into place. Doesn’t mean God always makes things perfect for me, but because of God, my wife and I have a close, loving relationship, and I learn more every day about my purpose here on earth.

My family is important to me, including my wife, son (about to turn 21) and daughter (18). My daughter is transgender, and LGBTQ rights are important to me (they were important to me before I knew she was transgender).

I’m a writer by nature. I wrote an awful book when I was fourteen on a typewriter. I’ve worked as a market researcher, but a writer is what I am.




What are some of your favorite things to do?

If you want to know about my interests, outside of hanging with my wife—I like dancing to DJ Earworm when nobody is watching, reading all sorts of stuff (last year’s favorites were ‘We Are Okay’ by Nina LaCour and Chuck Wendig’s ‘Wanderers’), working out/walking (I was a wrestler in high school, and I coached for youth wrestling many years), and watching University of Miami Football. I do like a good streaming series. We just finished Season 2 of ‘Fleabag,’ which I really enjoyed, and we’re starting ‘The Outsider,’ which is great.

I’d like to travel abroad someday.






Who are some of your other favorite authors to read?

C.S. Lewis. Other than that, a wide array. I like the Fredrik Backman books. I love ‘The Ocean at the End of the Lane’ by Neil Gaiman. Nina LaCour is a new favorite. I’ve read and enjoyed Solstice author David W. Thompson and, recently, Maria DeVivo.




What do you think of critique groups in general?

I still don’t know much about them.




Where do you see yourself in five years?

If things proceed as I desire, writing full time. We’ll see. I do like market research contracting, but if I could make a full-time living by writing, I probably would.




How many books have you written? How many have been published?

My Seams series has four books. And there’s Savage Spells Book 2 that’s recently been published. So, I’ve written six, two of them published.




After you've written your book and it's been published, do you ever buy it and/or read it?

Sometimes, but not for this one. I bought it, but I haven’t read it. It’s too fresh in my mind still.



Among your own books, have you a favorite book? Favorite hero or heroine?

Evee Salazar from ‘Everyone Leaves This Place,’ is near and dear to my heart.
After this, Paul Branch from ‘Dark Water & the Maiden.’




What is the most rewarding thing about being a writer?

When somebody says your book touched their heart. If you write from the heart, you tap into this universal need for connection and permanence, which I believe is Divine. ‘Love’s Heavy Spell,’ Savage Spells Book 2, even more so than Book 1, taps into some deep emotional territory. I hope it resonates with people, which is most rewarding.

Also, when you write something, and you know it’s super-hot (well crafted, sharp, highly readable, engaging, etc.). That’s a GREAT feeling because it only happens, for me, about 25-30% of the time.




If you weren't writing, what would you be doing?

I honestly don’t know.




What is your greatest desire?

To see my wife and children thrive and to serve a higher purpose here on earth. I know that’s two things. I believe these two things are connected though.






Are there any words of encouragement for unpublished writers?

Sixteen years. That’s how long it took me between writing my first novel and publishing. Also, keep your mind open to advice and learning new things to improve your writing. It helped me for sure.